EDIT MAIN
Plus_blue

Title I Part A

Title I, Part A is a part of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 as amended by the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). This Act provides federal funds through the Georgia Department of Education to local educational agencies (LEAs) and public schools with high numbers or percentages of poor children to help ensure that all children meet challenging State academic content and student academic achievement standards.

LEAs target the Title I, Part A funds they receive to public schools with the highest percentages of children from low-income families. These funds may be used for children from preschool aged to high school. Title I, Part A is designed to support State and local school reform efforts tied to challenging State academic standards in order to reinforce and enhance efforts to improve teaching and learning for students. Title I, Part A programs must be based on effective means of improving student achievement and include strategies to support parental involvement.

Under Title I, Part A local educational agencies (LEAs) are required to provide services for eligible private school students, as well as eligible public school students. These services must be developed in consultation with officials of the private schools. The Title I services provided by the LEA for private school participants are designed to meet their educational needs and supplement the educational services provided by the private school. 


Title II Part A

Title II, Part A was originally authorized as Eisenhower Professional Development and the Class Size Reduction programs under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965, was reauthorized in 2001 by the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) and in 2015 by the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). While ESSA was authorized in December of 2015, the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2016 extended the date by which certain parts of the Act would be effective. ESSA is in full effect as of July 1, 2017. Further guidance has been provided by USDE in the form of Dear Colleague Letters and FAQs.

Title II, Part A Supporting Effective Instruction Grant funds are obtained by a State on the basis of the United States Department of Education’s (USDE) approval of either (1) an individual State plan or (2) a consolidated application that includes the program. Through the program, state and local educational agencies (SEAs and LEAs) receive funds using a USDE provided formula based on poverty and population.

The purpose of the Title II, Part A grant is

  • to increase student achievement consistent with challenging State academic standards,
  • to improve the quality and effectiveness of teachers, principals and other school leaders,
  • to increase the number of teachers, principals and other school leaders who are effective in improving student academic achievement in schools, and
  • to provide low-income and minority student greater access to effective of teachers, principals and other school leaders.

Title III

Title III is part of the federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act. It awards eligible Local Education Agencies with funding to provide language instruction educational programs to English Learners (ELs). School districts with large English Learner populations receive direct Title III allocations, while school districts with lower incidence populations are grouped into the “Georgia Title III Consortium”. The Title III Consortium allows these “low-incidence” districts to participate in Title III activities similar to districts with large numbers of ELs. Upon attainment of English language proficiency, as measured by the "ACCESS for ELLs 2.0" assessment, EL students exit from language support services.

For more information about Georgia's ESOL Program (including Eligibility and Exit Criteria) follow this link to the State ESOL Program Webpage.


Title IX

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Title IX) prohibits discrimination based on sex in education programs and activities in federally funded schools at all levels. If any part of a school district or college receives any Federal funds for any purpose, all of the operations of the district or college are covered by Title IX.

Title IX protects students, employees, applicants for admission and employment, and other persons from all forms of sex discrimination, including discrimination based on gender identity or failure to conform to stereotypical notions of masculinity or femininity. All students (as well as other persons) at recipient institutions are protected by Title IX—regardless of their sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, part- or full-time status, disability, race, or national origin—in all aspects of a recipient’s educational programs and activities.

As part of their obligations under Title IX, all recipients of Federal financial assistance must designate at least one employee to coordinate their efforts to comply with and carry out their responsibilities under Title IX and must notify all students and employees of that employee’s contact information. This employee is generally referred to as the Title IX coordinator.

The essence of Title IX is that an institution may not exclude, separate, deny benefits to, or otherwise treat differently any person on the basis of sex unless expressly authorized to do so under Title IX or the Department’s implementing regulations. When a recipient is considering relying on one of the exceptions to this general rule (several of which are discussed below), Title IX coordinators should be involved at every stage and work with school officials and legal counsel to help determine whether the exception is applicable and, if so, properly executed.


Sports Equity

The Brooks County School System does not discriminate on the basis of gender in its athletic programs. Inquiries or complaints concerning sports equity in this school system may be submitted to the sports equity coordinator.